Simpson Park Hammock

Simpson Park is a natural preserve that encompasses over eight acres of tropical hardwood hammock in the center of Miami's urban core, one of the last remnants of the famous Brickell Hammock. The park's unique subtropical flora exemplifies the history and culture of Miami's diverse community. The creation and preservation of Simpson Park Hammock represents the Miami community's trend toward - and commitment to - environmental conservation, restoration, and exhibition of South Florida's flora and fauna for the purpose of public education and public benefit. The park area is also known to have been settled by Native Americans, including the Tequesta people. The majority of the park is comprised of native trees and undergrowth, with over 162 plant species in Simpson Park. Of these, at least 96 are native species, such as Red Stopper, Spicewood, Live Oak, Strangler Fig, Jamaica Dogwood, Gumbo Limbo, False-Mastic, and Lignum Vitae. There are 15 endangered species and 9 threatened species in the park, including Wild Cinnamon, Coffee Colubrina, Yellow Boxwood, Silver Palm, Strongbark, Eugenia confusa, and Gulf licaria.

 
 
 
 
 
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