Johnson Woods State Nature Preserve

Johnson Woods is one of Ohio's largest and best remaining old-growth forests. Many trees rise 40-50 feet before the first limbs occur and several are more than 400 years old. The largest trees, then and now, are white oaks, red oaks and hickories. The forest is proceeding through a natural succession from an oak-hickory community to a beech-maple community, so the maples and beeches are becoming more prominent members of the forest community. Swamp forest communities, dominated by red maples and pin oaks, are found in the more poorly drained sections of the preserve. In addition to its importance as one of the few old-growth forest stands remaining in Ohio, Johnson Woods is also significant for its size. At 206 acres, Johnson Woods is a self-supporting ecosystem. Its large size makes it less vulnerable to storm damage and threats from disease. Birds, such as the pileated woodpecker, scarlet tanager, Acadian flycatcher, wood thrush, ovenbird and hooded warbler, are found nesting at Johnson Woods along with many other species that are dependent upon larger tracts of forests. The size, age and history of Johnson Woods SNP make it one of the most significant forest communities in Ohio.

 
 
 
 
 
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